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  • Feminist Humanitarian Net

Information for new members

Updated: Sep 23, 2019


Vision

The vision of the Network is to transform the humanitarian system so it leads with feminist principles which demand responsiveness, accountability and accessibility to all women and their organisations, challenging rather than reinforcing structural inequalities.


Who we are

The Feminist Humanitarian Network (FHN) is an international collective of local and national organisations, international organisations, academic institutions and individuals. The Network recognises that the existing humanitarian system does not respond to the specific and disproportionate needs of women in crises or adequately recognise their leadership. The overall goal is to strengthen the agency and amplify voices of all women most affected by disasters.

The Network draws strength from the diversity of its members who have different and intersectional experiences of race, class, ethnicity, ability, age, sexual orientation, and gender identity. Together we are committed to redressing the power inequalities in the humanitarian system by ensuring those who identify as women are at the centre of leading and delivering humanitarian action. Collectively, we will mobilise support for women’s rights actors and feminist networks in humanitarian settings to achieve our vision.


Value driven membership structure

To reflect our vision and ambition to transform power dynamics in the humanitarian system, women’s rights organisations from the global South will lead the Network. As such, the Network will strive towards a membership with at least 70% representation by local and national organisations and no more than 30% representation of international organisations, institutions and individuals. This will also be reflected in its decision-making structures and processes.


Benefits

· Build alliances, share resources and learning on ways to increase women’s leadership, agency and voice in the humanitarian system.

· Create a powerful global feminist advocacy agenda based on the progressive feminist work and analyses by members of the Network to target shifts in the humanitarian system.

· Members of the Network will advocate to donors, governments and other stakeholders for redirecting funding in direct support of women first responders, groups and organizations.


How to join the FHN

Local and/or nationally focused organisations or individuals can be proposed by one existing FHN member; international NGOs must be proposed by two existing members. A membership form must be completed which provides information about the organisation (or individual’s) work, approach and principles, and how they can support the Network’s objectives. Once a prospect member has completed this form, they should submit it to: contact@feministhumanitariannetwork.org. The form will be reviewed by the FHN Membership Committee.


Members of the Feminist Humanitarian Network at the launch in Liberia

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Which local women’s rights organisations can join the Network? All local women's rights organisations working in countries affected by humanitarian crises (conflict, disaster, occupation) and who are committed to the Network objectives are invited to join. The FHN is focussed on ensuring that women’s rights organisations are able to carry on critical rights-based work during times of crisis. The Network seeks to ensure their contributions to humanitarian action are recognised, voices heard, and their work supported.


What does it mean to be a member of the Feminist Humanitarian Network?

Being a member of the Feminist Humanitarian Network means belonging to a global Network of committed feminists working together to transform the humanitarian system. Through face to face gatherings and regular online meetings, our global Network provides space for women leaders to share issues and define solutions to them. The Network is committed to amplifying the voices of local women’s rights organisations in advocacy spaces and more publicly, and to supporting local leadership to drive change within the humanitarian system.


Who can become a member? Organisations, academic institutions, and individuals can apply to become a member, however individuals must have a proven history of women’s rights work. Members must uphold the principles defined in the Feminist Humanitarian Network’s Membership Principles (attached). The Feminist Humanitarian Network is a self-identifying women-only network, and is closed to membership for men.


Is there a membership fee?

At present, there is no membership fee for new members. This will be reviewed once the Network has been established for one year.


What is expected of members?

All members commit to the Feminist Humanitarian Network’s Commitments Charter (attached), the Network’s objectives, vision and goal. All members commit to advancing one or more of the Network’s objectives. These commitments are discussed when the member joins the Network. Examples of ways members support include contributing to policy work at a national or global level, mobilising women they work with in support of network activities and objectives, speaking at events, or contributing resources.

All members have the option of participating in monthly Network calls. The monthly calls provide a space for members to share updates and arising concerns, and for the Network to collectively provide support and define solutions. The Network’s workplan at national and global levels is also discussed.


Does the Network provide funding to members?

Currently the Network is unable to provide funding to members directly. However, one of FHN’s key objectives is to influence donors, governments and other stakeholders to increase resources to women’s rights organisations and movements in support of their humanitarian response or preparedness activities. It is our ambition that we redirect current funding sources from large international organisations to local and nationally based women-led organisations to increase their role, influence and voice in humanitarian action and rights-based work.

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